All too often we hear that it’s disrespectful, morbid, just not proper or weird to do palliative photos or photos of a baby that has passed. There are many studies done to prove the opposite and that it aids in the grieving process. With so many movements these days to normalize the day to day things why should this be any different?

Have a look through DR DAVID CASARETT’s opinion on palliative photography in his article:

No photos, please! Families of my dying patients shy away from taking pictures in hospice, but why?

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Palliative Manitoba | Canadian Virtual Hospice

“The moment we heard about Dad’s cancer diagnosis, everything changed in our family. My sister has always been kind of withdrawn. Well, she started to take over. I felt like my own world had ground to a halt; I couldn’t do anything useful. My brother just got busier and busier – totally absorbed in anything as long as it had nothing to do with Dad. Our first family dinner together after we got the news: we were like strangers. We didn’t have a clue how to even talk to each other.”

How do we cope with serious illness as a family? How can we support one another? Check out Fred Nelson from Canadian Virtual Hospice’s article to find out more on how you can work together, how you can support one another in a life-changing time:

ALL IN THIS TOGETHER: COPING WITH ADVANCED ILLNESS AND DYING AS A FAMILY

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